How to Become a Popular Player

July 19, 2017 at 6:45 am (Roleplaying Posts) (, , , )

The other day I asked a friend when he might be available for some RP. He named a day, and I said, “Great! I’ll write that in my day planner.”

“You actually need a day planner for your RP?”

“I’d be lost without my day planner.”

I actually use my day planner for everything–what meals I’m going to cook, which house chores I need to get done, deadlines and work commitments, even a running to-do list of the various errata that pops up in the course of adult life. And that’s what I honestly meant when I said these words. But…it’s true. Every single RP scene usually makes it into my day planner, and I definitely usually have something lined up at least a week in advance every night I know I will be available for RP.

“I’m not that popular,” my friend said, and I felt a burst of true exasperation.

Popularity — Perception vs. Reality

This is actually a comment I’d heard before, from other people on the game. Most people do not have RP every single night that they want it. They wait, and wait, and wait to be asked, like girls at a 1950s sock hop, all lined up against the wall, hoping to get lucky.

These players perceive and believe that I am getting asked for every single scene I want to do. They believe people are just lining up, clamoring to RP with me. In reality, I do most of the asking. If I do 20 scenes in a month, someone else would have suggested 3 to 5 of them. Sometimes more. Sometimes less.

I get most of these scenes because I asked for them. I paged a person I wanted to scene with, suggested a scene, and asked when they might be available, clearly and concisely and with no room for any other interpretation. They said yes. We were off to the races. Done. Boom. We both got to do something fun that night.

Blanket Asks Don’t Work

[RP Channel] Random Player asks, “Does anyone want to RP?”

Most common answer: crickets. Nobody knows what to do with that. Nobody. It also reeks of desperation and a lack of skill. That’s why 99% of the time nobody says a word.

When I say I ask for RP every single night I want it I mean I pick someone off the WHO, page them, and ask them for RP, personally. I have a conversation with them. A great good deal of the time, RP happens as a result.

What does work:

[RP Channel] Savvy MUSHer says, “Anyone want to go on a frantic search for a missing child with me this evening?”

See the difference? You’re providing people with an idea of what they’d be doing and why they’d be there. You’ll get takers. You’ll meet people your char didn’t know before, and this will in turn spark more RP. It’s magic!

Passive Asks Don’t Work

A lot of players get really coy.

They page and they make some comment on RP they’ve seen you doing. They’re hoping to be noticed, to be invited, but the invitation just never comes, because when you do this, you are putting all of the onus on the other player to figure out fun for both of you, and unless the stars align– which, every once in awhile, they do– they’re never going to do that. They’re going to run off and RP and do whatever they’ve already planned to do with their existing character arc and character trajectory.

Another coy, passive tactic is to say something like, “Well, let me know if you need me for anything on that plot.”

My friends.

Nobody needs you for anything on that plot. Not if you’re doing it that way.

What a plot runner really needs is someone to go, “Holy shit, the entire village turned purple? Will you NPC the Mayor of that village? I wanna find out what’s wrong.”

Or:

“Holy shit, everyone’s purple? Well, I go take some blood samples. If I bring them to Dr. Fantastic, what will we find together in our scene? Can we scene around that?”

Or:

“Hey, my character is an expert on weird skin phenomenon. Says so right on my sheet. Everyone’s purple. What does that tell him? Who is already in the plot so he can go tell them all about it?”

See the difference?

This doesn’t work all the time. Some plot runners are bad plot runners. Some plot runners are really only interested in running this thing for people they know, and you gotta respect that. You might have to run your own plot to get the ball rolling. You might also just have to be persistent, to keep right on trying with different plot runners. But I’d say it works 9 times out of 10. Plot runners are hurting for people who will take a consistent and intelligent interest in the things they are doing. Seriously.

Sometimes You Gotta be the Idea Machine

There is an art to the ask if you want to get RP almost all the time. It requires some work on your part.

“Wanna RP? Just something random in a bar?”

Meh. I guess. Maybe. Actually, maybe not. I could go on a Netflix marathon, that sounds way more engaging.

Everyone these days usually has some sort of wiki or something that tells you about their character. Go. Scour those things. Look for ideas. Come up with something more creative.

“I see that you run a garage. How would you feel about my char showing up with a car problem?”

Ok, that’s better. It’s tailored specifically to the other player, and allows them to do some sort of RP they obviously wanted to do, or they would not have picked a mechanic. Anyone can come up with that kind of a scene. You don’t gotta be a plot genius, you dig? Now you have a reason to be there and the other player has a reason to stick around. Great.

Feeling really ambitious? You can make it even better in one of two ways.

“Someone’s wired my char’s car with a remote detonator bomb that hasn’t gone off yet, and I was thinking of taking it to a garage just in time for things to get really bad.”

Um. Hell yes. That’s a scene anyone is going to jump right on doing.

You can also just emit the car bomb being there as they work on the car and let them react. That’s fun too. You’ll get a bit of a reputation for being a person who makes things fun and interesting.

Again, this doesn’t always work. Sometimes people will turn you down. They’ll be busy, or tired, or you simply won’t exactly hit it out of the park when it comes to guessing the scene they might actually like. It’s fine. Move on, ask someone else.

No Ideas? No Excuse!

Yeah, I get creatively dry sometimes too. I’m not saying that you gotta be Mr./Ms. idea machine all the time. Cause something cool happens when you do this enough times. Eventually your char has a zillion friends ICly, and sooner or later they sort of catch on or have things they want to do with your char, and you get those rare but awesome asks from people you already know you enjoy RPing with.

But if you never have any ideas and you just sort of sit around the RP lounge hoping to get lucky, you’re not working hard enough. This is an RP game. Ideas are the literal coin of the realm. And they’re just not hard to come up with. I present three exercises you can do to get more RP than you can shake a stick at within the next 3 months. I dare you to try these exercises, and then the entire method, and then tell me in the comments how all this went for you.

Exercise 1: Wiki-Fu

I want you to pull up every character on the game that has not personally upset, offended, or harassed you in some way. I personally absolve you if you wish to exclude someone who is creepy or threatening. Got your list? Great.

Go through their wikis. If you’re on a game with +finger or +info instead of a Wiki, go through that. Do it with a pencil in hand. Write down at least 1 scene idea per character based on their char concepts, RP hooks, places you might mutually hang out, or whatever.

If there is literally no reason on all the earth why your char would or could ever have a conversation with that character, you can skip it, but 99% of the time you can think of something. You are all chars in a TV show and the Unlikely is the bread and butter of your fictional existences. Write it as a wishlist, even. It doesn’t have to be plausible. It just has to be interesting, and plausible enough to get the job done.

Exercise 2: Random Scene Starters

Write down 10 random scene starters that could work for anyone. This is stuff you can toss out on the RP channel, or just throw out at someone you kind of think looks cool and want your character to meet. Keep in mind that by using these you’re committing to emitting any NPCs that are involved, but…that’s not really that hard. It’s like playing a char, only it’s one you didn’t have to app and don’t have to keep.

I’ll do this one right now, just off the top of my head:

  1. Missing child example from above.
  2. Trapped in an elevator. Variant – Trapped in an elevator…with a bomb.
  3. Convenience store robbery.
  4. Beached whale needs help getting back into the ocean, or he’ll die. Variant: stray dog trapped in a fence.
  5. Chars take shelter in an unlikely place when a tornado places them in danger. IRL, my kiddo and my parents ended up locked in a bank vault with the bank employees once due to this very thing.
  6. Troll! In the dungeon! Thought you’d wanna know! See also monster at the pier, giant bird-thing in the sky plucking up virgins, whatever. May not work on all genres.
  7. Help! My character’s trapped on thin ice on an extremely dangerous river! Variant…Help! My character fell overboard!
  8. Car broken down on the side of the road. Variant: car wreck with two chars.
  9. Classic: I’ve got a short term danger and I need a rescue. Anyone can get poisoned by the way, even if you’re badass. Just…roll with it. You can figure out why later. More RP for everyone.
  10. Block party time! Everyone’s invited.

Congrats, now you have 10 scene proposals to launch at people until you get 10 great nights of RP. You will probably be more creative than me, since you know your theme. The theme itself probably has some unique hidden gems in it.

Exercise 3: Guess the Wish List

I am under the firm opinion that every character comes with a wish list attached to it, whether people realize it or not. You can, in fact, draw a direct line from the character concept to the type of RP that person likely wanted to do.

Examples:

  • Someone who is playing a cop/PI/federal agent, etc. wants to investigate crimes. They probably want to have chases too. Car chases, foot chases. Chances to shadow someone dangerous. Chances to find missing people and items, or catch murderers.
  • Someone who is playing a hacker or other computer type wants opportunities to use those skills to gather information. They also want to be able to “shut down the grid” or some such from their van, or install a virus into someone’s systems.
  • Someone who is playing a doctor obviously wants the opportunity to patch people up, diagnose interesting diseases, and perform breathtaking acts of lifesaving fury under extreme circumstances.
  • Someone who is playing an absolutely gorgeous knock-out who owns a club, is a dancer, sings, or whatever probably wants lots of opportunities to be seen and admired, and/or to seduce/talk her way out of trouble.
  • Someone who is playing an inventor or engineer wants the chance to design something cool for people. Taking something apart, dismantling traps, reverse engineering bad guy crap…all on the table.

First, look at your char. You probably had some specific RP experiences in mind, things you wanted to do when you took that character. Write them down, because they all suggest scene ideas.

Then, go back to your Wiki list. Ask yourself what was on other people’s wish list when they took that character. That’s probably a real good hint as to the types of scenes that will entice that person to get out of the lounge and get out onto the grid with you. You can use that to your advantage when you ask someone (again, directly, concisely) for RP.

You of course can throw out any scene ideas that you come up with that don’t excite you, too. If you’re not having fun, nobody else in that scene will have fun either. Just try to end up with a good long list. Get adept at setting these scenes, too…few people like being put on the spot when it comes to setting. Many like having that little warm up so they can put themselves in the scene. You probably like that too, but look, someone’s gotta be the hero here, and today I’m asking you to do it. You’re the one over here reading a very long blog post on how to be a popular RPer on a multi-player MUSH, after all. Or play-by-post game or whatever, as it happens, since the same principles basically apply.

Everyone is Here for the Same Thing

There is nobody who is not on this game to RP. Nobody really wants to sit around the lounge, or idle in their private room, bored to tears. Nobody.

So unless you are overtly creepy or rude, there is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to get RP whenever you want it. Especially if you put some effort into your scenes and give the other players a lot to work with. Next time you’re bored, don’t wait around. Put on your thinking cap, come up with a scene proposal…and ask for what you want.

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